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Diving News

CATEGORY:
Wendy Heller | Nov 1, 2007 2:00 AM
The acting mayor of Tuktoyaktuk, N.W.T., is frustrated wildlife managers have allowed a group of beluga whales to get trapped in nearby lakes for the second winter in a row. Merven Gruben told CBC News that at least 40 beluga whales are currently swimming in small sections of open water on the frozen Husky Lakes, a chain of lakes between Tuktoyaktuk and Inuvik
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Wendy Heller | Nov 1, 2007 2:00 AM
A WWF survey has discovered several marine turtle nesting sites on the beaches of Senegal, prompting calls from conservationists to improve protection of the endangered species. The survey - conducted by WWF staff, Senegalese wildlife officials and the local community between July and September - discovered nine new green turtle nests on the beaches of Joal-Fadiouth in the Saloum Delta south of the capital, Dakar. Turtle tracks in the sand left by female turtles were also discovered at nearby Palmarine Beach as well as at Langue de Barbarie at the mouth of the Senegal River in the northern part of the country
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Wendy Heller | Nov 1, 2007 2:00 AM
The mysterious "mass suicide" of 152 dolphins washed up on Iran's coast over the past month has alarmed environmentalists, with the blame pointed at regional fishing practices, officials said on Monday. In September, 79 striped dolphins were found washed up near Jask port in southern Iran, and last week another 73 were found dead in the same area. Pictures of rows of the corpses have been widely featured in Iranian newspapers, which said the dolphins had "committed suicide" -- behaviour the animals have occasionally exhibited in the wild. "The suicide of dolphins on Jask's coast continues," Iran's state run-newspaper wrote on Saturday. "Locals tried to put the animals back in the water but they refused to return
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Wendy Heller | Nov 1, 2007 2:00 AM
A vividly coloured fish could be the key to saving the Caribbean's coral reefs from plummeting into terminal decline, scientists claim. Their research forecasts that reefs risk being damaged beyond repair by the influx of seaweed. But urgent action such as protecting parrotfish, which graze upon the floral invaders, may prevent the ecosystems from reaching this tipping point
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Wendy Heller | Nov 1, 2007 2:00 AM
Italy, France, Japan and Spain are guilty of the biggest violations of international quotas for bluefin tuna fishing, a report claimed on Wednesday. Countries are assigned fishing quotas by the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) to help avert the eventual extinction of the fish, which is highly prized for Japanese sushi and sashimi. Italy fished 7,500 tonnes more than allowed in 2006, followed by France with 3,770 more and Japan with 3,550 tonnes, said the report, titled "The Plunder of the BlueFin Tuna in the Mediterranean Sea." In 2007, Italy, Spain and France were the biggest offenders
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Jason Heller | Oct 31, 2007 2:00 AM
Tehran - The mysterious "mass suicide" of 152 dolphins washed up on Iran's coast over the past month has alarmed environmentalists, with the blame being placed on regional fishing practices, officials said on Monday. At the end of September, 79 striped dolphins were found washed up off the port of Jask in southern Iran, and last week another 73 dolphins were found dead in the same area. Pictures of rows of dolphin corpses in the sand have been widely featured in Iranian newspapers, which said the dolphins had "committed suicide" - behaviour the animals have exhibited on occasions in the wild
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Jason Heller | Oct 31, 2007 2:00 AM
The oldest known fossils of jellyfish have been found in rocks in Utah that are more than 500 million years old, a new study reports. The fossils are an unusual discovery because soft-bodied creatures, such as jellyfish, rarely survive in the fossil record, unlike animals with hard shells or bones
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Jason Heller | Oct 31, 2007 2:00 AM
Coral reefs would receive stronger protections under a bill the Senate Commerce Committee unanimously approved today. Sen. Daniel K. Inouye, D-Hawai'i, the bill's sponsor and chairman of the committee, called coral reef preservation "vital" to national interests, especially for fishing, tourism and coastal communities. "Coral reef-related services and resources are worth billions of dollars each year to the U.S. economy and economies worldwide," he said. Coral reefs are critical for Hawai'i, which is host to more than 410,000 acres of living reef around the main islands alone, Inouye said. The bill, which would reauthorize a law enacted seven years ago, would make it illegal to damage corals. It would exempt scientific research, fishing, emergency responses and other activities authorized by federal and state laws
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Jason Heller | Oct 29, 2007 2:00 AM
As the federal government is set to finalize stricter limits on fishing the Gulf of Mexico's popular red snapper, fisheries regulators are under heightened pressure to rebuild at least four other beleaguered Gulf fish stocks in upcoming months. Though not as highly prized as snapper, greater amberjack, gray triggerfish and red and gag grouper have come under increased pressure from commercial and recreational anglers in recent years. A report this summer from the National Marine Fisheries Service made that clear, showing that all four of those species, along with red snapper, are subject to overfishing, meaning the species is being harvested too fast to reach optimal growth in the future. New federal fisheries laws require regulators to set new limits on fishing within a year after a species is subject to overfishing. In response, the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council is meeting this week in Biloxi, Miss., to consider new regulations on amberjack, grouper and triggerfish. The council is not expected to make a final regulation decision for any of the species this week, but will likely lay the groundwork for a determination by January. The new plans for the fish species will be one of the first proving grounds for a new federal fisheries law requiring regulators to monitor how the species is being harvested throughout the rebuilding plan. The law is meant to prevent the delays in management that led to a federal judge intervening on behalf of the red snapper earlier this year
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Jason Heller | Oct 29, 2007 2:00 AM
The Humane Society of the United States is urging organizers of the Destin Fishing Rodeo to permanently end the shark division event after the killing of an 844-pound mako shark. The Humane Society sent a letter to the Rodeo at the request of local citizens. Dr. John Grandy, senior vice president for wildlife and habitat protection at the Humane Society of the United States, said, uA?Spectacles such as the Shark Division of the Destin Fishing Rodeo are preying on the destructive reputation that sharks achieved in the movie Jaws, while promoting the idea that the lives of sharks don't matter
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