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Dive Photo Guide

Diving News

CATEGORY:
Jason Heller | Nov 5, 2007 2:00 AM
By the end of the century many popular seafood dishes will disappear from our tables as shellfish become increasingly scarce, scientists warn. They have found that the build up of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is causing the oceans to grow more acidic as increasing amounts of the gas dissolve in sea water. This change is reducing the ability of shellfish to make their protective shells. By 2100 some waters are expected to be corrosive enough to cause the shells to dissolve completely, making it impossible for them to survive. Marine biologists warn that this could have a devastating effect on the ocean environment, as other creatures that eat shellfish will find food increasingly scarce while corals, which make reefs, will also be unable to build their hard external skeletons
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Jason Heller | Nov 5, 2007 2:00 AM
The annual dolphin-hunting season in Japan is drawing protest from activists who say the practice is cruel. Some in Japan say it's cultural
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Jason Heller | Nov 3, 2007 2:00 AM
This summer, during the second phase of a two-year scientific survey of the waters around the Aleutian Islands, scientists discovered what appear to be three new marine organisms. This year's dives surveyed the western region of the Aleutians, from Attu to Amlia Island, while last year's assessment covered the eastern region. During the dives, two potentially new species of sea anemones have been discovered. Stephen Jewett, a professor of marine biology and dive leader on the expedition, says that these are "walking" or "swimming" anemones because they move across the seafloor as they feed
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Jason Heller | Nov 3, 2007 2:00 AM
THREE giant man-made reefs will be built off the NSW coast to boost fish stocks for recreational fishing. The State Government will today announce it will construct the reefs within three nautical miles of Newcastle, Sydney and the Illawarra. Each reef will be made of four steel or concrete pyramid-like structures up to 11 metres high, anchored together. Similar reefs have been built in South Korea and Japan - two of the world's leaders in the technology. NSW Primary Industries Minister Ian Macdonald said an environmental assessment had been made of the possible biological, biophysical, economic, social and environmental impacts of using artificial reefs
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Jason Heller | Nov 3, 2007 2:00 AM
For $20,000, companies and individuals can attach their name to tons of concrete railroad ties and culvert pipes in a plan by St. Lucie County to sell naming rights for 23 planned artificial reefs. The names of those who purchase the rights will be stamped on private and county navigation maps for all to see
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Jason Heller | Nov 3, 2007 2:00 AM
On an illuminated wall in the American Museum of Natural History, three clear plastic tubes about 5-feet long and a couple inches in diameter automatically fill with water. In the first tube, a small amount shoots up, barely visible at the tube's bottom, representing the meager 3 gallons of water that the average Ethiopian subsists on daily. The middle tube fills about one quarter full, showing the more bountiful 30 gallons of water the average Briton uses in a day. Both amounts pale in comparison when water fills to the top of the third tube and shows the astounding 150 gallons of water that the average American uses in a day
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Jason Heller | Nov 2, 2007 2:00 AM
To marine biologists, "plastics" is a dirty word. Fish and birds can eat or become tangled in fishing gear or other plastic flotsam. But what about microscopic pieces of plastic in the oceans? They come from products used to clean ships or deteriorating larger pieces of plastic. In a study in Environmental Science and Technology, Emma L. Teuten of the University of Plymouth in England and colleagues point out that microscopic plastic is a potential problem, too. The particles can adsorb pollutants. The researchers looked at how plastic particles picked up a pollutant, phenanthrene. They found that plastic adsorbed far more of the chemical than sediments
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Jason Heller | Nov 2, 2007 2:00 AM
A vast rubbish dump, which covers an area bigger than Australia, is floating in the Pacific Ocean and research shows it is growing bigger. The rubbish collects in one area because of a clockwise trade wind that circulates around the Pacific rim. In his Tasmanian-built research vessel, Captain Charles Moore has just returned from a trip through the plastic stew floating between Hawaii and San Francisco
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Jason Heller | Nov 2, 2007 2:00 AM
Loggerhead sea turtles dug their fewest nests in two decades on Florida beaches this year, their ninth straight year of decline, initial tallies show. That is making some scientists worry about the long-term survival of Florida's best-known sea turtle and one of its top ecotourism attractions. Brevard's beaches are the largest nesting site in the Western Hemisphere for loggerheads. Thousands of people are drawn to the Space Coast annually to go on "turtle walks"
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Jason Heller | Nov 2, 2007 2:00 AM
More than one in three of Europe's freshwater fish species faces extinction because ecosystems are being destroyed, the World Conservation Union said Thursday. Scientists from Switzerland and Germany have found that 200 of the 522 species of European freshwater fish are threatened by the rapid development of agriculture and industry over the past 100 years, the group said. The union, a network of nations, agencies and some 10,000 scientists and experts from 181 countries, said 12 species are already extinct
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