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Diving News

CATEGORY:
Jason Heller | Nov 23, 2007 2:00 AM
At the urging of the Department of State-led U.S. delegation to the United Nations, member states last week agreed to strengthen protections for vulnerable and endangered shark populations around the world
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Jason Heller | Nov 23, 2007 2:00 AM
The US has added its voice to international criticism of Japan's largest-ever whaling expedition
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Wendy Heller | Nov 15, 2007 3:00 AM
The European Commission has approved the extension of protected sites throughout Europe, a move that environmental groups believe will improve conservation efforts to protect the continent's most seriously threatened habitats and species. The 4,225 newly designated Natura 2000 sites of specially protected areas cover about 90,000km2 - an area roughly the size of Portugal - within four bio-geographical regions
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Wendy Heller | Nov 15, 2007 3:00 AM
Call it the ocean that time forgot. About 400 million years ago, the Rheic Ocean played a big role in Earth's history. When this massive body of water closed, the Appalachians were lifted to Himalayan heights and the planet's continents slammed together to form the supercontinent of Pangaea. Dinosaurs and early mammals evolved to traverse the large swath of land, spreading life to every corner of the globe
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Wendy Heller | Nov 15, 2007 2:00 AM
The captain and crewmen of a Chinese ship responsible for an oil spill after hitting the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge have refused to speak to federal investigators, a spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board said Wednesday. But the local pilot who was guiding the ship told investigators that its radar had malfunctioned shortly before the accident. The spokesman, Peter Knudson, said crewmen aboard the Cosco Busan, the 900-foot vessel that spilled 58,000 gallons of fuel into the bay on Nov. 7, have hired lawyers in the face of possible lawsuits and charges
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Wendy Heller | Nov 15, 2007 2:00 AM
This is the fourth story in a continuing series on the Megafishes Project. Join National Geographic News on the trail with project leader Zeb Hogan as he tracks down the world's largest freshwater fishes. Hucho taimen may be known to the Chinese as the river god's daughter, but in this remote corner of northern Mongolia, the world's largest trout has long been king
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Wendy Heller | Nov 13, 2007 2:00 AM
Australians fear that the world's only known white humpback whale could be slaughtered as Japan's whaling fleet prepares to embark on its annual hunt in the Southern Ocean
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Wendy Heller | Nov 13, 2007 2:00 AM
A rare type of jellyfish has been photographed for the first time off the South West coast. The orange-pink creatures, called apolemia uvaria but also known as "pearl strings", have been seen off Plymouth and the Cornish coast
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Wendy Heller | Nov 13, 2007 2:00 AM
East Asian countries are importing between 50% and 90% more Russian sockeye salmon than Russia is reporting as caught, according to a new report from WWF and TRAFFIC, the wildlife trade monitoring network. Analysis of data from officially published sources reveals that from 2003 to 2005, the estimated excess quantity of Russian sockeye salmon entering East Asian markets was between 8,000 and 15,000 tonnes each year, worth US$40-76 million
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Wendy Heller | Nov 13, 2007 2:00 AM
Tel Aviv University Professor (and alumnus) Hudi Benayahu, head of TAU's Porter School of Environmental Studies, has found that soft corals, an integral and important part of reef environments, are simply melting and wasting away. And Prof. Benayahu believes this could mean a global marine catastrophe. Environmental stress, says Benayahu, is damaging the symbiotic relationship between soft corals and the microscopic symbiotic algae living in their tissues. There is no doubt that global warming is to blame, warns the marine biologist, explaining that this symbiotic relationship is key for the survival of most soft corals
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