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Diving News

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Wendy Heller | Dec 6, 2007 2:00 AM
An environmental group is urging companies to drop shark fin from their banquet menus as demand rises in the booming economy ahead of the holiday hospitality season, a media report said Tuesday
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Wendy Heller | Dec 6, 2007 2:00 AM
Scientists know this already, but just to give you some idea of the problem, the Greenland ice cap is melting at such a fast rate it is triggering earthquakes as pieces of ice several cubic kilometres in size break up. Scientists say the acceleration of melting and subsequent speeding up of giant glaciers could be catastrophic in terms of sea level rise and make previous predictions published this year by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) far too low. The glacier at Ilulissat, which it is believed spawned the iceberg which sank the Titantic, is now flowing three times faster into the sea than it was 10 years ago
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Wendy Heller | Dec 6, 2007 2:00 AM
Manatees remain on the state's endangered species list, for now. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission decided on Wednesday to delay voting on removing the manatee from the list until it reviewed the species classification. The commission did not say when the review might be finished. "Delisting the manatee has basically invoked concerns over the listing process," the commission chairman, Rodney Barreto, said. The commission had been considering whether to reclassify the manatee as threatened instead of endangered
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Wendy Heller | Dec 5, 2007 2:00 AM
Unnoticed and unappreciated for five decades, a large female turtle with a stained, leathery shell is now a precious commodity in this city's decaying zoo. She is fed a special diet of raw meat. Her small pool has been encased with bulletproof glass. A surveillance camera monitors her movements. A guard is posted at night. The agenda is simple: The turtle must not die. Earlier this year, scientists concluded that she is the planet's last known female giant Yangtze soft-shell turtle. She is about 80
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Wendy Heller | Dec 5, 2007 2:00 AM
Cambodia and the UN have launched a joint project aimed at saving endangered Irrawaddy dolphins from extinction, the international body's World Tourism Organization said Tuesday. The Mekong River Discovery Trail Project encourages local fishermen to work in dolphin-watching tourism instead of fishing, the UN agency said in a statement. Fishing nets often cause the death of Irrawaddy dolphins. "Local authorities believe fishing is depleting the dolphins' food supply. Fishermen will be encouraged to take visitors to see the dolphins and sell food and drinks instead," it said. It did not give financial details
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Wendy Heller | Dec 5, 2007 2:00 AM
The rising demand for jellyfish in the overseas market is threatening the survival of the endangered Olive Ridley turtles in Orissa, experts say. Extensive fishing for jellyfish along the Orissa coast to cater to the demands in the overseas markets is creating a food shortage for Olive Ridleys, Biswajit Mohanty, coordinator of turtle conservation group Operation Kachhapa, told IANS. The abundance of jellyfish on the Orissa coast attracts thousands of Olive Ridleys every year during winter months, mainly at Gahirmatha, Devi and Rushikulya, for food and nesting. 'Earlier, our fishermen used to discard the jellyfish as unwanted catch, but now they are being sent to markets as far as Chennai and then to China,' said Mohanty
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Wendy Heller | Dec 5, 2007 2:00 AM
Just a few years ago, the lush coral reefs off Indonesia's Bali island were dying out, bleached by rising temperatures, blasted by dynamite fishing, and poisoned by cyanide. Now they are coming back, thanks to an unlikely remedy: electricity. The coral is thriving on dozens of metal structures submerged in the bay and fed by cables that send low-voltage electricity, which conservationists say is reviving it and spurring the growth. As thousands of delegates, experts, and activists debate climate at a conference that opened this week on Bali, the coral restoration project illustrates the creative ways scientists are trying to fight the ill-effects of global warming
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Wendy Heller | Dec 5, 2007 2:00 AM
In a bid to protect the fast- diminishing perlemoen [abalone] stocks, Environment Minister Marthinus van Schalkwyk has imposed a ban on scuba diving and snorkelling in areas along the Cape coast. The prohibition will take effect from February 1, environmental affairs spokesman Mava Scott said yesterday. It comes in the wake of the suspension of commercial perlemoen fishing, which is to come into effect on the same date
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Wendy Heller | Dec 5, 2007 2:00 AM
Terri Irwin has granted the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society permission to rename its ship currently known as Robert Hunter in honor of her late husband, Steve Irwin. Captain Paul Watson, founder and president of Sea Shepherd and Terri Irwin officially announced the new name for the ship Steve Irwin at a press conference at 12:00 on December 5th at Victoria Docklands in Melbourne, Australia. Sea Shepherd is proud to partner with Terri Irwin to launch Operation Migaloo as she and Steve have been world renowned for their conservation work. Terri knows that Steve would have been extremely honoured to be acknowledged in this way as he shared Sea Shepherd's passion for saving whales
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Jason Heller | Dec 5, 2007 2:00 AM
X-Ray Mag issue #20 is out and available for download
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