DPG is a comprehensive underwater photography website and community for underwater photographers. Learn underwater photography techniques for popular digital cameras and specialized professional underwater equipment (wide angle, macro, super macro, lighting and work flow). Read latest news, explore travel destinations for underwater photography. Galleries of professional and amateur underwater photography including wrecks, coral reefs, undersea creatures, fashion and surfing photography.
Dive Photo Guide

All News

CATEGORY:
Wendy Heller | Nov 12, 2007 2:00 AM
Tiny ocean plankton can reduce global warming by soaking up unexpectedly large amounts of carbon dioxide but their carbon-bloated cells might damage marine food chains, scientists said on Sunday. Experiments in a Norwegian fjord showed that plankton - small drifting plants or creatures - could absorb up to 39 percent of the main greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, in seawater pens that simulate projected climate conditions to 2150
continue
Jason Heller | Nov 11, 2007 2:00 AM
Underwater photographers and film makers flocked to the the French Riviera (Antibes) for the 34th World Festival of Underwater Pictures from Oct 24th - 28th. Gyula "Jules" Somogyi was there for DivePhotoGuide
continue
Wendy Heller | Nov 10, 2007 2:00 AM
An upcoming episode (Nov. 14) of History Channel's Monsterquest will supposedly show the largest squid ever caught on video. A squid researcher with film crew in tow filmed a squid estimated to be between 50-100 feet long at 1,000 feet in the Sea of Cortez
continue
Wendy Heller | Nov 10, 2007 2:00 AM
Dozens of dead and injured seabirds found coated in black goo are the most visible victims of a 58,000-gallon (220,000-liter) oil spill in the San Francisco Bay that scientists say could threaten wildlife for years. The spill fouled miles of coastline, sending environmentalists scrambling Thursday to save the bay's birds, fish, invertebrates, and marine mammals
continue
Jason Heller | Nov 10, 2007 2:00 AM
Stephen Frink has sent us studio photos of the new Seacam Seaflash 150 strobe, including comparison shots with the popular Ikelite DS-125. The new strobe weighs 2.65 lb (1.2 Kg)-approximately the same weight as the Ikelite DS125
continue
Wendy Heller | Nov 9, 2007 2:00 AM
Members of the international body responsible for the management of bluefin tuna in the Mediterranean Sea must agree to a moratorium on fishing for this imperilled species or risk the end of a valuable fishery. WWF is calling on the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) - meeting this week in Antalya, Turkey, from 9 to 18 November - to support a multi-annual closure of the fishery for at least 3 years to give stocks a chance of recovery
continue
Wendy Heller | Nov 9, 2007 2:00 AM
Captain Paul Watson and Sea Shepherd staff members, International Director Jonny Vasic and Events & Media Relations Director Kristine Vasic departed for Melbourne November 5th after a successful five day visit to Fremantle and Perth in Western Australia. "It was a very successful trip," said Captain Watson. "We have a great deal of support in Western Australia and it was very encouraging to hear the views and the deep concerns that Western Australians have for the whales
continue
Wendy Heller | Nov 9, 2007 2:00 AM
About 290 million years ago, Earth's lakes were a shark-eat-amphibian-eat-fish world, new fossil evidence reveals
continue
Jason Heller | Nov 9, 2007 2:00 AM
Our good friend Todd Essick is making his New York debut in association with the Global Art Force in an exhibition together with three other artists titled Civilization vs. Nature
continue
Wendy Heller | Nov 8, 2007 2:00 AM
Japanese scientists have identified two light receptors in marine algae which appear to be responsible for the proliferation of these plants. The scientists hope to use the findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, to control unwanted algal growth, such as red tides, or to cultivate coveted species of kelp that are used as food. In their experiment, the scientists removed the receptors genetically from a species of algae, called vaucheria, and found that the plant could no longer grow even though it was exposed to blue light for the next six months
continue
TYPE:
Sponsors




Newsletter
 
Travel with us